Evan C. Plotkin

Title
President and Owner, NAI Plotkin

Educational Background
B.A., University of Miami, Miami, FL
B.A., Florida International University, Miami FL

Contact Information
Evan C. Plotkin
Phone: (413) 732-2158
Fax: (413) 781-2100
Email: evan@splotkin.com

Specialty
Property and Facilties Management

Full Bio +
As President of NAI Plotkin, a Springfield based Real Estate Brokerage and Management Company that has been in business in the local area half a century, Evan has extensive experience in all aspects of real estate brokerage and property management, including commercial office buildings, medical office buildings, industrial buildings, shopping centers, and condominium/residential management.

Serving on the NAI Global Asset Services Council along with 30 other esteemed members globally, Evan is directly involved with the sharing of a collective wealth of knowledge, including best practices and new technology for effective property management. Recently, NAI Plotkin was awarded a property management assignment for the largest office supply retailer in the world. Through the NAI network we are servicing this client nationwide.

While NAI Plotkin has global capabilities and recognition, locally the firm is recognized as one of the largest full service real estate organizations in the region. Evan's portfolio currently includes the management of over six million square feet of commercial and retail space and approximately two million square feet of residential units. Clients range from institutional to regional in scope and include such entities as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Office Building, the U.S. Postal Service, and Staples, Inc.

Locally, we have represented the City of Springfield and the Springfield Redevelopment Authority in a consulting capacity and have managed multiple city owned tax title and surplus commercial and industrial properties as directed by the Office of Planning and Economic Development. In addition, we have acted as Construction/Asset Manager on behalf of the Massachusetts Development Finance Agency for a 150,000 square foot Class A office building. We presently manage three State Office Buildings, including the Governor's office in Western Massachusetts, on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Division of Capital Asset Management.

Community Activities/Affiliations

Springfield Business Improvement District Treasurer
Center for Human Development Board Member
Springfield Chamber of Commerce Executive Board Member
Homeless Employment and Training Committee Member
Forest Park Zoological Society Board Member
Somers Educational Foundation Board Member
Springfield Library and Museum Association Corporator
City Stage and Symphony Hall Board Member
Human Service Forum Corporate Member

Vision for Springfield

Evan's involvement with the economic development of Springfield can be traced back as far as 1978 in a publication entitled, "Time for Springfield: Rebirth of Downtown", a 96 page magazine outlining an ambitious program for revitalizing Downtown Springfield. As a member of the Springfield Central Executive Committee, company founder Samuel Plotkin served with many other esteemed members of the business community in an effort to make downtown Springfield once again a place of activity and the focus of civic pride.

Evan's passion for the revitalization of the city is evident more recently through his involvement with many organizations. Evan has been asked to serve as an unpaid consultant for many initiatives, including:

  • Urban Land Institute- September 2006
    Evan served as a corporate sponsor for the ULI Advisory Service Panel Report. The goal of the program was to bring the finest expertise in the real estate field to bear on complex land use planning and development projects, programs, and policies.
  • UMass Amherst, Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning - Spring 2010
    Evan served as a panelist for the review of the students' final project – From the Quadrangle to the River: Revitalizing the Heart of Downtown Springfield, a conceptual design for downtown Springfield.
  • Pioneer Valley Planning Commission - August 2011
    Evan served as a member of the selection committee for transit-oriented development market study for the HUD Sustainable Communities Initiative grant done by PVPC and Hartford Capitol Region COG.

CLICK HERE TO SEE A 3-MINUTE VIDEO ABOUT OUR CORPORATE SERVICES

Arts Initiatives

UMASS GALLERY AND STUDIO SPACE AT 1350 MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD

Over the past 14 years Evan has focused his efforts on the creative economy and has strived to develop an arts culture in the city. His development strategy is grounded in the theory that Springfield must become a place where people want to live, work, and play. It is his belief that the key to creating such an environment is the presence of the artist, who will come to the city if the right balance of economic incentives is offered. Attracting artists to live and work in Springfield to fill the now empty factories and office buildings will generate pedestrian traffic and, in doing so, begin to change the perception of dark, empty streets and the perception of crime.

Evan has led the charge in this regard by offering the One Financial Plaza lobby as a gallery space at no cost to the artist. For the past few years, 1350 Main Street has showcased the final project of art professor John Simpson's Commonwealth Honors College students in the lobby of One Financial Plaza. The student's final project is based on the Springfield Symphony Orchestra's final show, with this year's performance being Gustav Holst's "The Planets Suite". These works, inspired by Holst's tribute to seven of the planets in Earth's solar system and the mythological figures for which they are named, will be on display until they are replaced by next year's pieces.

His latest endeavor came about somewhat serendipitously when John Simpson needed a place to store his paintings on short notice due to the loss of his studio space at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst as a result of a problem with the fire suppression system. Evan offered the ninth floor, which had sat vacant for six years, to John as a temporary fix. With the natural light coming through the windows on the north side of the building, beautiful views of the city, tile floors and sinks, they quickly realized that the space had potential to be much more than a storage space. The students cleaned the space, painted the entrance of the gallery in UMass-Amherst colors (maroon and white), hung paintings, and created works, including self portraits of the artists whose work is on display.

HOOP CITY JAZZ FESTIVAL

As a committee member of the Hoop City Jazz Festival, Evan has helped to bring the festival to downtown Springfield's Court Square for the past two years. The Hoop City Jazz Festival has drawn over 20,000 attendees with headline performers like George Benson in 2011 and Terrance Blanchard in 2010

ART & SOLES

Evan's vision to have artist paint sculptures to be strategically placed throughout the downtown was the driving force behind this public art project. Not only did the project draw attention to the downtown, it also helped to raise funding for local artists

JAMES KITCHEN PUBLIC ART INITIATIVE

Over the past 14 years Evan has focused his efforts on the creative economy and has strived to develop an arts culture in the city. His development strategy is grounded in the theory that Springfield must become a place where people want to live, work, and play. It is his belief that public art will help to reshape our thinking about this great city.

As a result of Evan's efforts to create an installation of artist James Kitchen's work at 1550 Main Street, there is currently a show of 52 pieces of his art on display at 1550 Main and an outdoor walking tour which features 18 large sculptures crafted with recycled metal throughout downtown Springfield.

On Sunday, August 19, 2012, a massive, 36-foot tall steel bird sculpture was installed in the walkway between One Financial Plaza and Café Lebanon on Main Street. Based on the sheer size and scale of this sculpture, not to mention the beauty of the piece, the sculpture will be a constant reminder of Springfield's destiny, one of becoming the future cultural capital of the region

Giant Bird Sculpture is installed at Springfield's One Financial Plaza
Giant Bird Sculpture video

CITY FANTASTIQUE
As a committee member of City Fantastique, Evan has brought installations of art work created by UMass Fine Arts students to the gallery in the lobby of One Financial Plaza. The pieces are thematically tied to a performance at Symphony Hall.

Publications
Evan's passion to revitalize Springfield is evident throughout articles and publications that have been written about him and in his own blog.

Business West

MassLive.com

Metro Musings

Other related articles:

Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray and congressmen Richard Neal and John Olver were expected this morning to update efforts to bring passenger rail service to the so-called Knowledge Corridor, a term for the Hartford-Springfield metropolitan region that's home to 1.8 million people, about 1.1 million workers and more than 120,000 students spread over 32 colleges and universities.

Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray and congressmen Richard Neal and John Olver were expected this morning to update efforts to bring passenger rail service to the so-called Knowledge Corridor, a term for the Hartford-Springfield metropolitan region that's home to 1.8 million people, about 1.1 million workers and more than 120,000 students spread over 32 colleges and universities

Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray and congressmen Richard Neal and John Olver were expected this morning to update efforts to bring passenger rail service to the so-called Knowledge Corridor, a term for the Hartford-Springfield metropolitan region that's home to 1.8 million people, about 1.1 million workers and more than 120,000 students spread over 32 colleges and universitiesThe state is poised to spend about $17 million on train tracks running between Springfield and Vermont. The deal with Pan Am Railways, which owns the tracks, is expected to be formalized soon, according to Timothy Brennan, executive director of the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission.

To read more, go to:

IN LOWELL, AN ARTFUL REAWAKENING

By Kathleen Pierce
Globe Correspondent / August 16, 2012

  • • LOWELL — A buffalo on skis stands in the window of a former deli. Around the corner, a long-gone ice cream shop gleams with new floors and splashy outsider art.

Walk a block south or west and construction crews hammer away, turning relics from the city's industrial past into soon-to-open art spaces.

"There is a groundswell happening right now," said Susan Halter, executive director of the Cultural Organization of Lowell and Cultural Affairs office. "This feels like Boston 20 years ago."

Or perhaps, Brooklyn five years ago.

Long the butt of many jokes (see "The Fighter"), this hard-scrabble mill town is riding a wave of reinvention led by a steady stream of artists and a string of new galleries and venues that have opened recently to showcase their talents.

"This is need-based," said Lindsey Parker, codirector of Uncharted Studios and Gallery, a youthful art collective settling into a highly visible storefront on Merrimack Street.

Upstairs, 24 artists, writers, and filmmakers work in threadbare studios that rent for $75 to $250 a month. The median age is 27.

One of them is Parker, who instead of lighting out for New York to "follow the herd," decided to "build a gallery in a place that needed one."

Running a gallery at 24 "is seriously a dream," said the sandy-haired printmaker, who recently graduated from Montserrat College of Art in Beverly.

That free-wheeling, anything's possible spirit is what lured Alan Nidle and Karen Boutet to open the Zeitgeist Gallery around the corner.

Reinventing their bohemian Cambridge outpost that closed in the mid-2000s into a sprawling storefront on Market Street for the same price they would pay for a tiny spot in Inman Square was hard to resist.

The couple, who have ties to the area because Boutet grew up here, feel they have arrived right on time. "If you want to really ride the wave, you have to wait till it's cresting," said Nidle, who has a reputation as an iconoclast.

In the '80s he transformed an ATM booth in Cambridge into a studio apartment and invited homeless people to spend the night. "I enjoy being on the fringe where I can be gloriously different," said Nidle.

Both the Zeitgeist and Uncharted usher in new urban energy to the city's downtown art scene that is raring for renewal.

"We are starting to reach critical mass. Nobody is going away," said Maxine Farkas, who as the director of Western Avenue Studios, has witnessed the change firsthand.

The mill-turned-art-complex that opened in 2005 with 31 studios will reach 300 by year's end. Recently owner Karl Frey continued the conversion to include Western Avenue Lofts: 50 artists' live/work apartments that rent for an average of 94 cents a square foot.

"People walk in and fall in love with the space," said Farkas, who was one of the first to move into a one-room loft with concrete floors and communal slop sinks in June.

Located in an industrial cul-de-sac, just beyond the city's newly sketched cultural district, Western Avenue Studios has been a creative beacon for years. Now that the downtown is waking up with artist-established galleries, the bootstrap ethic ("If we can't get commercial galleries to come to Lowell, we will start our own, damn it") is stronger than ever, said Farkas.

It's that do-it-yourself attitude that's made artists like Michael Dailey Jr. jump in with both feet. "It's not uppity. That's the best part. People are willing to collaborate and are open to new ideas. It doesn't feel so establishment," said Dailey, codirector of Uncharted.

That Uncharted Gallery opened in July with a five-band blowout featuring groups from Northampton and Brooklyn on the city's main thoroughfare, instead of off the beaten track, is significant.

"It's exciting that these people were able to crack the downtown," said Walter Wright, cofounder of the 119 Gallery, about a mile from the city's core. Wright, an arbiter of the avant-garde, and his wife, Mary Ann Kearns, scoured derelict buildings downtown for years before opening their Lower Highlands gallery in 2005.

Part of what's driving the downtown renaissance is landlords and developers who finally seem to understand what artists want: affordable places to create. Marshall Field, owner of the Wyman's Exchange building, is a perfect example. He struggled for years to find someone to move into the fifth floor when Lahey Eye Clinic moved out. Five years later, he found Uncharted.

"Downtown is hurting for tenants in the upper floors. It used to be filled with insurance companies, doctors, and law firms, but they all moved out," said Field, who gave Uncharted a 75 percent reduction in rent to turn former exam rooms into studios. "It's good for the downtown because they attract people. The art crowd is more sophisticated and educated and they fit in with the college scene," said Field, who would like to rent to more artists. "The downtown is going through a transition right now. The artists groups will help."

Longtime developer Nicholas Sarris had the same hunch. After a half century renovating churches, courthouses, and medical buildings in Lowell, he is working on his first art studio conversion. This spring, construction began on the 1800s Gates Block. The manufacturing building, home to a rug shop recently and a Greek newspaper press decades ago, is being transformed into three dozen art studios with the possibility of a gallery and arts center.

"Artists are making an impact in the downtown area. I think they will be good for this piece of property," said Sarris, who plans to price these light-filled studios affordably and rent them by January.

Across town, in the city's growing JAM (Jackson, Appleton, and Middlesex streets) area, another developer is working furiously on a similar concept. Although details are being kept under wraps, Mill Number Five, a retail, art studio, café, and theater space, has the potential to be "an atomic bomb for economic impact," said Mauricio Cordero, its director.

To Cordero, the former executive director of the Revolving Museum, "This is Lowell 3.0." The Revolving Museum, which came to town in 2002 under the leadership of artist Jerry Beck, struggled to stay afloat, seeing itself as a nonprofit education center. It closed in late July. Lowell's new art scene is looser, freer, and as Nidle said, will "react to the status quo."

According to John Wooding, who teaches political science at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and chairs the Cultural Organization of Lowell, the city's creative revival is timely. "It's a very exciting place. It's come out of the dark spot of the last couple years," he said.

Wooding said he suspects Lowell's creative economy could one day drive the city's economic development and create jobs, as outlined by Richard Florida's 2002 book, "The Rise of the Creative Class."

To Wooding, the pillars of the downtown — the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the National Historical Park, and Middlesex Community College — give Lowell an edge over other post-industrial cites, such as Haverhill, that look to the arts for reinvention.

But what happens the next few years will be crucial, he warned.

"There is a new creative class, but what does it look like? Does art create jobs and a better life for people?" said Wooding. "If you have art galleries downtown, it doesn't mean you are Paris."

Page 2 of 2 --

"People walk in and fall in love with the space," said Farkas, who was one of the first to move into a one-room loft with concrete floors and communal slop sinks in June.

Located in an industrial cul-de-sac, just beyond the city's newly sketched cultural district, Western Avenue Studios has been a creative beacon for years. Now that the downtown is waking up with artist-established galleries, the bootstrap ethic ("If we can't get commercial galleries to come to Lowell, we will start our own, damn it") is stronger than ever, said Farkas.

It's that do-it-yourself attitude that's made artists like Michael Dailey Jr. jump in with both feet. "It's not uppity. That's the best part. People are willing to collaborate and are open to new ideas. It doesn't feel so establishment," said Dailey, codirector of Uncharted.

That Uncharted Gallery opened in July with a five-band blowout featuring groups from Northampton and Brooklyn on the city's main thoroughfare, instead of off the beaten track, is significant.

"It's exciting that these people were able to crack the downtown," said Walter Wright, cofounder of the 119 Gallery, about a mile from the city's core. Wright, an arbiter of the avant-garde, and his wife, Mary Ann Kearns, scoured derelict buildings downtown for years before opening their Lower Highlands gallery in 2005.

Part of what's driving the downtown renaissance is landlords and developers who finally seem to understand what artists want: affordable places to create. Marshall Field, owner of the Wyman's Exchange building, is a perfect example.

He struggled for years to find someone to move into the fifth floor when Lahey Eye Clinic moved out. Five years later, he found Uncharted.

"Downtown is hurting for tenants in the upper floors. It used to be filled with insurance companies, doctors, and law firms, but they all moved out," said Field, who gave Uncharted a 75 percent reduction in rent to turn former exam rooms into studios. "It's good for the downtown because they attract people. The art crowd is more sophisticated and educated and they fit in with the college scene," said Field, who would like to rent to more artists. "The downtown is going through a transition right now. The artists groups will help."

Longtime developer Nicholas Sarris had the same hunch. After a half century renovating churches, courthouses, and medical buildings in Lowell, he is working on his first art studio conversion.

This spring, construction began on the 1800s Gates Block. The manufacturing building, home to a rug shop recently and a Greek newspaper press decades ago, is being transformed into three dozen art studios with the possibility of a gallery and arts center.

"Artists are making an impact in the downtown area. I think they will be good for this piece of property," said Sarris, who plans to price these light-filled studios affordably and rent them by January.

Across town, in the city's growing JAM (Jackson, Appleton, and Middlesex streets) area, another developer is working furiously on a similar concept. Although details are being kept under wraps, Mill Number Five, a retail, art studio, café, and theater space, has the potential to be "an atomic bomb for economic impact," said Mauricio Cordero, its director.

To Cordero, the former executive director of the Revolving Museum, "This is Lowell 3.0."

The Revolving Museum, which came to town in 2002 under the leadership of artist Jerry Beck, struggled to stay afloat, seeing itself as a nonprofit education center. It closed in late July. Lowell's new art scene is looser, freer, and as Nidle said, will "react to the status quo."

According to John Wooding, who teaches political science at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and chairs the Cultural Organization of Lowell, the city's creative revival is timely. "It's a very exciting place. It's come out of the dark spot of the last couple years," he said.

Wooding said he suspects Lowell's creative economy could one day drive the city's economic development and create jobs, as outlined by Richard Florida's 2002 book, "The Rise of the Creative Class."

To Wooding, the pillars of the downtown — the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the National Historical Park, and Middlesex Community College — give Lowell an edge over other post-industrial cites, such as Haverhill, that look to the arts for reinvention.

But what happens the next few years will be crucial, he warned.

"There is a new creative class, but what does it look like? Does art create jobs and a better life for people?" said Wooding. "If you have art galleries downtown, it doesn't mean you are Paris."

Kathleen Pierce can be reached at kmdpierce@gmail.com